Settlers of Catan

Great game, relationship between resources and communities, also involves probability/odds in determination of resources. Instead of Catan, could easily call the game Settlers of Jamestown for a US History class for example.

various titles

These are books covering every conceivable military campaign of history or army of history. The value comes from the brevity of the books, the conciseness of detail, and the photographs and color artwork that accompany the text. The research behind the books tends to be first-rate as well. If not used directly or made available to students, they can supplement knowledge in areas you feel you as a teacher need help with.

Days of Decision

First edition tends to be directly tied with the World in Flames boardgame (making it harder to implement). This gives a good overview of the buildup to war, but requires some tinkering for classroom use.

Iron and Fire

This requires one of two things–>money to purchase ship miniatures -OR- time, which can be used to xerox/create ship silhouettes. For a classroom budget, silhouettes are probably more efficient, and students could even be assigned creating the silhouettes, researching ships, etc. before playing. For an added twist, anyone who has a ship sunk has to have their assignment torn up! This recreates hesitation at throwing ships in to battle willy-nilly and creates a very realistic hesitation.

Road to Osaka

The rules are ok while the supplements have good information on Japan’s feudal system. The advantage is the rules are simple. The disadvantage is that it requires having little figurines (although using Risk pieces work).

Pendragon Role-Playing

Best use would be to research Arthurian values, etc. and let students create knights based on those values following this up with an adventure of their own. Pendragon is very thorough and true to Arthurian legends and medieval culture. It is a lot of work to use this, but it also has a correspondingly big payoff if successful. Good to use with “Le Morte d’Artur” or “The Green Knight”